Browsing Tag

writing

Starting the Story in the Right Place

While traveling last weekend (which is why I didn’t post a segment of The King’s Daughter), I tried to read a historical mystery novel. It was the first in a series of several and I’d hoped I’d found a new Sebastian St. Cyr or Nell Sweeney. Instead I found a boring series of events and gave up about 25% of the way through the book.

My main gripe? Well, it wasn’t until 14% of the way through the novel that we had an inciting event. Until that point, I wasn’t sure what the plot of this book would be, or whether it just would be a long string of events.  In my mind, everything that happened in the first 14% (and first YEAR) of the novel could have been summed up in a few sentences. The novel would have been better served to start there, when the heroine finally found the suspicious letter that got her moving.

It’s an important lesson to learn.

When I first submitted “Touching the Dead” to Jim Baen’s Universe, there was another scene at the beginning. The editors there quickly pointed out that my story would be served better to start on the next scene, and anything important from scene 1 could be worked back in later. I did as they suggested, and they bought that story. Easy peasy.

After that point, I always tried to start with the dead body.

It doesn’t work for all my stuff, but I try to get there as quickly as I can.*

So it’s worth keeping in mind (for authors) that we need to tell readers up front what this story’s about and why we should keep reading. There needs to be a clear beginning (along with the middle and end.) And finding that beginning can be difficult.

I, for one, often write parts that end up being cut off.  For example, The King’s Daughter has TWO prologues. Both were intended to tell the reader that X was going to happen later in the book.  However, in the ultimate version, I will definitely cut one, and possibly both. The book really starts when the soldiers arrive.

I cut scenes off the beginning of a lot of my stuff. I feel, strangely, that I benefit from writing them, even if I know early on I’m not going to use those scenes. They help ME understand the backstory, and while backstory doesn’t always surface in the final product, it fills out the characters for me.

So my advice would be to go ahead and write your rough draft, starting it wherever you want, but keep your mind open to trimming that beginning off later.

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*My big exception to this is Dreaming Death, where the editor asked me to add a few days to the beginning of the story. It originally started roughly where Chapter Nine is now. I wasn’t wild about the change, but the editor asked and I delivered. Then the next editor was baffled why nothing happened in the beginning of the book and asked me to take most of it out. I tried, but since I was in the middle of moving to another state and under a very short deadline, I really couldn’t do that successfully…leaving me with a version of the book that is too front heavy for my liking. If I ever get the rights to that book back, perhaps I’ll change it back to the way it was. I liked that version better.

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And speaking of Dreaming Death and “Touching the Dead”, I plan on releasing an ebook version of three short stories set in that world, all of which occur before the novel itself. “Touching the Dead” is included in this, and is the first meeting of Shironne and Colonel Cerradine.

Shared Dreams should be out later this month, and will sell for 99 cents…so look for it on Amazon and Barnes & Noble!

(typewriter photo via Pixabay)

 

Reblog: Things an Author Doesn’t Actually Control

Reblogging this because a friend just got a nasty-gram from a reader because one of her books isn’t out in mass market paperback.  Since I am in exactly the same boat, I thought this old post was pertinent.

It’s interesting (and sometimes infuriating) to see some of the things that fans blame on authors. Authors who are traditionally published often have little control over their published properties. That’s simply part of the way that the business runs.

But authors still take heat for some of these things. Recently an author had a book released, and for some reason, Amazon didn’t release the ebook on time.

And fans sent hate mail to the author.

Can you really call those fans?

So I’m going to put down here a list of Things that Traditionally Published Authors Generally Don’t Control.*

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The Release Date

Yes, we don’t have much say over when our next book is coming out. Our publisher sets up a scheduled date and everyone races toward getting things done on time, but if we miss a crucial part in the publication process (say, for example, edits just take too darn long or surgery kept the author from getting a manuscript turned in on time) then the book might get bumped. Not to the next month, but to the next open slot in the publisher’s schedule….which might be 18 months away.

(That’s a simplification, but essentially, moving the publication date is difficult.)

((An author’s writing speed is another factor, although that’s not usually controlled by the publisher. Some authors can put out 4 books per year. Others put out one book every 7 years. It’s art, people, and not all artists move at the same pace. Be patient, please.))

Releasing ON the Release Date

This happens all the time. Books don’t get put out on their release date. Snags happen in Amazon’s or B&Ns ebook delivery, and the ebook doesn’t appear in the device on time.

This is INCREDIBLY frustrating to authors, too.

An author I know had a book come out in early February, and the nearby B&N still doesn’t have it on the shelf. They have 6 on order. I’ve asked. Those six are supposedly sitting in the warehouse, but for some reason, they’re simply not being shipped to the physical store. The customer service people don’t know why. I’ve been in to ask about it twice, and they’re supposed to call me when it comes in, but not having the books there two months later doesn’t help an author with first week/month sales.

Sadly, there’s little the author can do about it. We can email Amazon. We can contact our agent or our editor, who can contact someone else, but sometimes things just don’t get done.

Please don’t be angry at the author. I guarantee they want that book on the shelf, in the mail, or on your device.

The Price

If we’re talking about a traditionally published book, then no, the author has almost no say over the price. Currently, my older trade paperbacks are hovering near $15. I would LOVE to see them at $9.99. But it’s not going to happen.

I would love to have my ebooks go on sale. It’s not going to happen. I can ask, my agent can ask, but we don’t make that decision. Amazon points out on its page that these are the publisher’s prices, publishers have negotiated with Amazon, and the rest of us are stuck with the results.

So why not just give everything away for free?

Seriously? This is our job, and we should be paid for our work. Yes, we’ll post an occasional free thing. Yes, we like making things available to new readers. But we need to earn money, too. We have to pay our rent, and for genre fiction, at least, the best way to do that is via a traditional publisher right now.

Availability

This is related to all of the above. See where I  talked about the book that’s still not on shelves after almost 2 months? It happens a lot when a book comes out.

It also happens when a book is older. We cannot force Amazon to carry a book in stock. We can’t force B&N to carry all the books in our series. And we certainly don’t control used book sales.

(Martha Wells once told me an angry fan suggested that she was making The Element of Fire hard to find  so that she could drive up the price of the used books.  This is a ridiculous claim, first because an author doesn’t control the number of used books floating around and secondly because the author doesn’t get a penny from the sale of a used book. Ugh!–This was years ago, of course, before ebooks made out of print books easier to find.)

But there’s also a problem with that book that’s out of print. Being out of print doesn’t mean that the author can just put a copy up in their website. Since we’re talking about traditional publishing here, the author has a contract with the publisher for each book, and that contract determines who has the right to put the book out (in any form). Because publishers invested money in those books, they like to hold on to the right to reprint a book for….well, a long time. It varies.

But it often takes the author years to get the right to publish their book back. Sometimes it never happens (if it’s a particularly draconian contract–this is why we need agents).

And once the author gets those rights back, it may not be worth their while financially (or in stress) to try to self-publish a novel. Life may interfere and make a book unavailable.

Continuing/Finishing a Series

Yeah….this is problematic. If a publisher bails on a series, the author’s caught in a conundrum. We have limited options at that point.

A) We can convince another publisher to purchase the remaining parts of the series. This is MUCH harder than it sounds, because any publisher will know that they can’t control the books that are already published by another publisher.  (It would stink if they published books 4-7, but no one could get their hands on books 1-3 because the original publisher decided to let them go out of print.)

B) We can self-publish the remaining books. The downside here is that we’re never guaranteed that we’ll make a profit on this. The novella I published back in October is still not quite in the black. After a couple of tries at that, selfpublishing becomes a daunting prospect fraught with snowballing expenses and vast amounts of time sucked in. Not everyone wants to chase that rabbit.

Authors are in a Catch 22 situation here: people get upset if they never publish the next book, and yet the author may never see a payoff equal to the amount of money and time they put into it. (Essentially the publisher decided that readers weren’t willing to pay enough to read the author’s word to make it worth their while to publish more…and sometimes that’s proven out by the lack of response to a self-published book.)

What Can an Author Do?

These are just some of the situations where an author has limited control, but basically, all an author can do is ask people to buy their books.  Even if those books arrive a day late. Or are hard to find. Or are slow coming out.

We can ask people to buy, to review, to recommend.

What Can a Reader Do?

A reader can play the other end of the line. Buy the book, leave a review, recommend it to a friend. You can ask your bookstore to carry a book. You can suggest it to the library where you borrow books. You can suggest it for your reading group.

But please don’t write an angry email/blog post/review because of a factor that the author can’t control. Don’t write and tells us we suck because your kindle book cost more than $7.99.

That’s the sort of thing that makes writers want to quit publishing.

Publishing is hard. Be nice to your authors.

*Here are some other, excellent posts on the same subject:

Cherie Priest

Nicole Peeler (especially in regards to piracy)

Elizabeth Eulberg

Jeff Cohen

#SFWAPro

Adventures in Indie #7: The Dreaded Newsletter

I’m heading into the area of promotion, and I have to admit that I’m at a bit of a loss here. Trying to grasp all the types of promotion available is like drinking from a fire hose. It’s overwhelming.

But there is one staple I can start with: A newsletter

Now, a large percentage of writers have newsletters. This is currently ‘what you do’. Who knows whether it will remain that way? But I am using the newsletter to keep reader apprised of my new publications, special prices, and various freebies I’m running.

When I was with Ace/Roc, I mostly flailed around with the newsletter, not sure what to do. And at that time I had about 50 subscribers, so it was what is sometimes called an ‘organic’ list. All of those people had sought out my webpage and joined, but I wasn’t making special efforts to attract new readers.

Essentially, I didn’t know how.

One of the differences in going mostly indie is that I have no choice but to get that in hand, so I started researching ways to reach more people. My friends at Codex (one of my writers groups) made some GREAT suggestions that had really helped.

So here’s what I’ve got…so far.

  1. Use a newsletter service like MailChimp, MailerLite, or Sendy to handle the newsletters for you. My friends are fairly evenly divided between the first two, but I’ve seen Sendy gaining ground for those people with huge mailing lists (like 13K). Sendy is installed on your webpage and you basically send the newsletter rather than having MC or ML send it for you.
  2. Have a newsletter sign-up pop-up on your webpage. I actually created a new web-page so that I could do that (it wasn’t possible on my old webpage).
  3. Look at other author newsletters to see what you like. Copy shamelessly.
  4. Use a service to attract new readers like Instafreebie (my favorite) or Bookfunnel. I use Instafreebie to offer free books to people who join my mailing list. There is some question whether this people will ever -buy- a book, but it’s also true that exposure is exposure.
  5. Join group promotions. When someone comes to look at Author A’s offering, they might also enjoy yours.
  6. Try not to inundate people’s mailboxes. I mail once a month at most.
  7. Offer them incentives, if you’re feeling magnanimous.  I often include a free short story with a newsletter. For me it’s a chance to expose more people to my writing, and a chance for me to practice my formatting skills, as I often create .mobi and .epub files especially for those.

All of that said, I’m not an expert. I’m just starting out.

In the last several months, though, I’ve gone from about 50 members to about 1600. That’s a decent increase. I cannot attest to the ‘quality’ of my subscribers (a lot of people who pick up free books will only read free books, so they’ll never become purchasers), but I have seen a consistent increase in numbers of books sold.

And my aim was to have a bit of a base built before I released Original in April (I hope). So for those aims, it’s meeting my needs well enough.

So what’s worked for you and your newsletters? 

 

 

 

Adventures in Indie #6: Self-made books

I talked a couple of weeks ago about using Canva to make covers for ‘promotional’ books. And generally to save costs on those books, I also format them myself.

Now, I have to say up front that my method of formatting is not the best. There are a lot of ways to format a book.  Some people use Scrivener, which can put out a book in EPUB format. Personally, I found Scrivener too complicated, so I gave up on it after six months.  I have a friend who uses InDesign, but when I did a trial of that, I found it WAY too complicated also.

So what are some of the options I’ve used?

Way back in 2011, I formatted my books using the guidelines that Smashwords recommended. This led to decent books, although nothing special.

But I wanted something a little better looking for this new generation of books.

So for The Dragon’s Child, I tried out a service called Pronoun. It basically takes your Word file and makes it into an ebook (but not a print book). They give you a choice of layouts (6 at the time that I used it), lay your document into that, and put it out as an epub and mobi. They will even upload it to all the vendors that way.

It’s a free service as well. (Here’s a pretty comprehensive review of the service). So far I’ve been pretty happy with the book they produced for me. However, it’s not available as a print book, something that I may work on this fall (see below.)

Since then, however, I’ve been working with a new program that I like pretty well to produce ebooks -and- print books.

My editor/formatter, Rick Fisher at EQP Books, turned me on to the program that he uses: Serif PagePlus 9.  So far this program has been easy to learn and I’ve been super happy with the books that I’ve produced.  (See Fleurs du Mal and A Time for Every Purpose, available as .pdf files on the bottom of my Free Fiction page.)

Again, I’m just producing my promotional books this way (because I want my editor to review my novels for me!), but that frees me from being tied to Pronoun’s placement restrictions, so I’m uploading them to Amazon and D2D myself.

The best thing for me about PagePlus is that it’s a fairly intuitive interface. Most of the menus have similar structure to Word, so that means that someone who uses Word all the time will find it easier to work with than, say, InDesign (which is an Adobe product). I can create .mobi, .epub, and .pdf files, and even used that .pdf function to create the cover for my print version of The Sparrow in Hiding. Really versatile.

Also, because it’s a legacy product, it’s inexpensive. I paid 24.99, rather than the new subscription services like Adobe. So I’m happy with it so far!

 

Next Week: The Dreaded Newsletter

 

 

Adventures in Indie #5: Formatting and Editing

Back in 2011, I put up some books on Amazon and Smashwords and sold them. I formatted those myself, and while they were adequate, they didn’t look particularly…professional.

For my new forays into self-publishing, I wanted a product that looked better. So I paid someone to do an edit pass and format my books for publication.

There were two reasons for this:

  1. I wanted another person’s perspective on the product before I put it out, someone with formatting and editing experience.
  2. Learning to format these myself is a steep slope, one I wasn’t willing to climb at the time.

After looking through recommendations from my writers’ groups, I went with an editor I’d met before (at a convention), Rick Fisher at EQP Books (e-Quality Press)

Before I selected them, I looked at some books they’d edited, checked their prices, and discussed with Rick what level of edits I was interested in.

(For example, I was not interested in a “Developmental Edit” or “Content Edit”, which is the kind of edit where they suggest changing a plot point or removing a chapter to tighten things. I was more interested in a “Line Edit”, which is where they’re looking for grammar and clarity issues instead.  It helps to know what you’re looking for before choosing an editor.)

Here’s a great article by Rinelle Grey with Tips for Choosing the Right Editor.

Once I knew that I’d found the right editor, a lot of the same rules will apply in working with him as did with my cover artists:

  1. Be Professional.
  2. Be Timely. Don’t expect the editor to have your edits done in four days. They have other authors to edit, and other deadlines outside that. So make sure you’ve allotted plenty of time for the editing step. (I usually try to check in with mine before the manuscript is even done to set up a date. I’ve told him my manuscript for Original will get there early- to mid-March. And if I can’t make that date, then I’ll notify him as soon as I can so he can shuffle projects if needed.)
  3. Have a good idea how much you can pay. Most professional editors will have prices on their websites. Put that together with how many words you’ll have, and that should tell you whether you can afford them or not.
  4. Pay on time…or work out something with them. Don’t stiff your editor.
  5. Make sure you let others know if you’re pleased with the work.

Overall, I found that having a professional editor working with me takes a lot of pressure of my mind when releasing a new book. It takes a weight off my shoulder to know that someone else is doing all the niggling little work that makes me batty!

And so far, I’ve been extremely happy with my choice of editor. I will be using them for the foreseeable future!

Next Week: Publishing Software

 

 

 

 

 

Adventures in Indie #4: PreMade Covers

One way in which a writer can cut costs is to purchase a premade cover. These are bountiful on the internet–all you have to do is type ‘premade book cover’ into your search engine, and you’ll find dozens of sites offering these.

I had been in the habit of perusing these for some time, basically because I like to use the covers as references for what I DO like. If a designer asks me what I’m looking for, I can use those as examples, making it easier for the designer to know what I expect.

I’m sure you’ll hear this…that a large percentage of those online covers are terrible. I do think that’s true. But sometimes when you’re looking at the  dross, you’ll find a sparkly in there, too.

So here’s a few hints that might help:

  1. If you’re looking at a site that aggregates covers from many different artists and you find one you like, look to see whether you can search that artist’s covers separately. It makes sense that if you like one of their covers, you’ll like others.
  2. Remember that you cannot fine-tune these covers. That’s why they’re sold as premade and at a lower cost. So don’t purchase one thinking that you’ll get to change hair color or have the artist change the clothing.
  3. Look for a statement that says they won’t re-sell the cover to someone else. While there’s a good chance that you’ll see the basic cover IMAGE elsewhere, design should be unique.
  4. If you want to know whether a certain image has already appeared on book covers, try plugging the image into an image search engine, like TinEye. Simply right click on the image, copy the image address, and paste it in the search function. When I was looking at covers for Iron Shoes, I did this and found that some images of women with horses have appeared on a gazillion books already. (This won’t work if they’ve altered the image for the cover.)

And here’s what I did:

I published 2 books with premade covers this year (but purchased 3 covers).

I hadn’t planned on publishing this one. But in those random searches, I ran across a cover that caught my eye, and I thought, “Hey, that cover would go well with Whatever Else.”

The main thing I wanted was mood. The cover itself is a bit generic, doesn’t have any quotes from other authors, no tag line. It’s very basic, but it’s good enough.

“Whatever Else” is actually a short story, so I knew I would never price it higher than 99 cents. I couldn’t spend a lot of money on a cover for it.  But this one cost me $40…and that meant 120 sales at 33 cents (royalty) each. I figured that over its lifetime, the short story could sell that many copies….

I bought the cover. I purchased it from the online site, BookCoverDesigner.com, and within a day the cover artist got back to me and made the changes to reflect the proper title and author name. In a case like this, there’s no room for big changes, so don’t expect them. If you want something more or something different, you’ll have to go with a custom design.

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I also purchased this cover from SelfPubBookCovers.com. This one cost twice as much as the one above ($80), but SPBC gives me a few more options.

Because I do the changes myself.

However, because I’m the one who puts in the title and author name, plus tagline, I can fiddle with it pretty endlessly. So this cover will be on my dashboard there forever.

If I decide to change the story’s name, I can. (Which I did, by the way…so it was a good thing that I opted for this rather than the maker above.) I can change the fonts and placement of the words. I can change their color and size.

For the most part, I’ve decided not to do so. I don’t trust that my eye for design is any better than this designer’s (FrinaArt), so I stuck with her decisions.

But here’s where it gets weird…

I also bought this cover. 

No, I don’t have a book to go with it. I have an idea, just one that I haven’t written yet.

But I watched this cover on SPBC for months before deciding the pull the trigger and purchase it. They won’t sell a cover twice, so if someone else bought it first, I would lose it.

And it goes too well with the one above to not take the chance.

Oddly enough, this is NOT by the same designer.

I’m considering this the companion novella to go with Sparrow, but instead of summer 1815 in St. Petersburg, I think this one will be winter 1815 outside Moscow. And the woman on the cover? I’m pretty sure that’s Natalya Vladimirova, one of a long line of powerful healers and protector of a dragon named Long who has slumbered for centuries…

I think it’s worth it, and having purchase this will give me extra impetus to get the story done!

So…..

All in all, I’m happy with the premade covers I’ve purchased and the balance of cost to use.

NEXT WEEK: Canva

 

Adventures in Indie #3: More Cover Choices

I’ve been talking about my indie publishing experience so far, and last week I talked about a cover I had made in 2015. But that takes me into 2016, wherein I published 6 ebooks.  SIX.

Publishing books costs money, and publishing six of them costs…more money.

As an indie publisher, I had to plan for that. I knew that much of 2016 would happen at a loss because I was paying artists for covers and an editor/formatter for their services.

Today I’m going to talk a bit about the other cover designs I had custom made. The covers I purchased ran the gamut from inexpensive to pricey. In each case, I had specific reasons for that choice.  So let me talk briefly about each one:

CUSTOM DESIGN COVERS:

I had previously published the three novellas here separately, but wanted to package them together and create a print edition. So I removed the old versions from sale, did an editing pass, and handed it off to my editing/format guy (EQP Books) while I was arranging for a cover.

For this book, finding stock photos was problematic. My main character has white hair, and that’s actually an important part of the story, so unlike other covers where I changed small things in the story to match the cover, I wanted the cover to match the story instead. And since Iron Shoes had been my most financially successful tale, I decided to go with Holly Heisey on this one.

Their covers are more expensive, but worth it since I was going for something very specific. Holly sent me an extensive questionnaire, and I sent it back to them. They sent me back suggested pictures based on that, and I picked one out and sent it back to them. Then the magic started.

Holly changed clothing color, hair color, and added -magical- touches that did a good job of conveying that this was a fantasy story (but also a romance). They also created a paperback cover for me (which ups the charge for any cover package.) All in all, I got what I wanted for this book.

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After the War was created by Rachel A. Marks. Once again, I wanted to somewhat-match the style of the Golden City novels, since this is a related novella. Rachel worked with me on this one much the same way as the previous cover (The Seer’s Choice) we did together.

Because I was working with her far in advance of the publication (I hadn’t even finished the novella when I contacted her) I was able to work in the opposite direction from the above experience. For example…when I first started the novella, Serafina had short hair. It was easy to change that, though. In addition, since Rachel and I had decided on a model for the cover, I could write that costume into the first scene….

(I did that on the last book with her, too.)

Rachel’s prices were not exorbitant (you can click over to her website to look at her cover designs) and I’ve really liked the work I’ve gotten from her.

 

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Now the cover of Oathbreaker is different, in that I was looking for a different ‘feel’ than any of my previous books.  I have to admit, I may have referred to the CW network at some point during the quest for these covers.

Since I’d been in the habit of surfing photo sites for a while by then, I went to the artist–Kate Marshall–with some pictures already in hand. I had seen Kate’s designs for Rhiannon Held’s work, and thought that would fit this series of novels well, so I actually booked Kate to produce the covers for -all three- novels in this series.

That makes it a lot easier, by the way, if you’re trying for cohesiveness in your covers. 

I gave Kate my pictures and my answers to her questions, and she got back to me with several proposed designs. She gave me a set of covers without people (mood covers, basically), a set with the setting that I suggested behind the characters, and a set with a different backdrop.

As it turned out, the setting that I suggested…did not work. It was way too busy and distracted from the character on the cover and from the title and wording as well.

What did work was the setting backdrop that she picked out. It captured the mood of the stories…and it turned out that it was no problem to tweak the writing to fit it in!.  So I went with what she picked and am far happier with her results. She made changes to the clothing and characters to make them work better with the story.

So the next handful of covers that you’ll see for novels will be from Kate. (She’s penciled me in to do the Dreaming Death sequels, too.)

 

Some final points about engaging a cover designer:

  1. Have some idea what you want before you go to them. It never hurts to look through websites of cover designers to know what kinds of covers will match your books. Provide links for your designer to look at.
  2. Be open-minded about what the designer suggests. Even though I thought I knew what I wanted on the Oathbreaker cover, it turned out that my pick looked awful, and what my designer suggested looked far far better.
  3. Remember that you can change small details in your story. That’s always worked well for me to make the cover match better.
  4.  If the cover isn’t coming out the way you want it to, try to figure out where you’re not communicating properly. When working on the Iron Shoes cover, I told Holly that the character had white hair. What I failed to communicate was that I meant WHITE…like magically white. Holly and I went back and forth several times on hair color until I finally realized I could send them a picture of what I wanted…and they got it right away. So make sure you’re communicating with your cover artist.
  5. Don’t be a jerk. Your cover artist has other commitments. Book your covers with plenty of time in advance to tweak them. It’s like the saying, You rush a miracle man, you get rotten miracles.

 

NEXT WEEK: PRE-MADE Covers and the writers who love them…

 

Oathbreaker Paperback Now Available

Oathbreaker has now come out in paperback, and should be available via other stores (like B&N shortly.) I will be having a Goodreads giveaway as well, starting on the 24th and running through the end of the month (there will be more details in my newsletter on the 30th.)

 

Adventures in Indie #2: Choosing Covers

Now that I’m talking about my indie publishing experience (so far), I have to decide how to divide this up into digestible bits.  And the first area that I’ll talk about is my covers.

One of the frightening things about a traditionally published book is having little or no control over the cover. If you’re not a big name, then you’re going to have to hope that your editor is actually reading your books and has a good eye.  My covers at ACE/ROC were AMAZING!

No thanks to me. It was all my editor at the time: D or J. Both of them did a great job of communicating cover ideas to the art department and got beautiful work done.

But when it came time for me to start publishing my related novellas, I had to wade into the world of cover art with no one to hold my hand. Back in 2011, cover art was pretty simple. Now it’s a multi-million dollar industry with a gazillion practitioners and jarringly different styles available everywhere.

So what did I do?

For my first cover (The Seer’s Choice), I had some simple needs:

  1. I wanted the cover to look similar to (but not copy) my Golden City covers.
  2. I wanted the model on the front to look somewhat like what I pictured for my character.
  3. I wanted the cover clothing to be moderately period-appropriate.

Those aren’t huge demands. But when I went to engage a cover artist, I made sure that she knew those three things up front.

I chose my cover artist (Rachel A. Marks) for The Seer’s Choice because I’d seen her work on another writers’ books where she did #1.  So I knew that 1/3 of my wishes were taken care of.

But for #2 and #3, I had some work yet to do.  She got back with me with a list of questions that would give her information about the series, plus a couple of sites that she preferred for stock imagery so I could look at pictures to give her a visual idea what I wanted.

Luckily for me, I found a model that I liked pretty quickly. Her clothing didn’t match anything in my story, but that was an easy fix–I just wrote it into the final scene. She needed a hair change, and the setting had to be picked out, but once Rachel and I made those decisions, I stepped back and let her do her magic.

This is probably a good thing to remind others looking for cover artists about: the artist has to work within certain limitations. For example, the setting, the model, and her hair came from three different photographs. That means that my artist had to pay for use of 3 pictures.

Could I have made a dozen more changes, found more exact details? Yes. But every little thing costs money. Keep that in mind.

Rachel got back to me with some mockups just to check composition and text.

 

I made a few suggestions for changes.

She got back to me with the next version.

We agreed on some final changes.

And a few days later, I had my various covers. (I had covers for the ebook and for the print version*.)

(Rachel also did some drawing on the cover to pull everything together, plus some lovely effects to make the final cover more…magical.)

I also used this same artist (and process) for After the War, my other novella set in the Golden City world, so you know I’m super happy with her work.

So here are some simple guidelines that I’ll suggest for using a cover artist.

  1. Ask around and see who your friends have used, or alternately, look at other books and pick an artist you like. Usually the artist is listed on the same front page that the copyright and author are listed on.
  2. Be prepared for it to take a while. If an artist is good, they’ll probably have a waiting list. Also, it simply takes time to go through all those steps, communicating back and forth. (And they have lives outside doing your cover. Seriously.)
  3. Pay your cover artist for their work. You expect to be paid for your writing, so they should be paid for their design work. If you can’t afford your cover artist, then you probably should find another way to get a cover.
  4. Remember that it’s NEVER going to be exactly what you have in your mind. The artist has to work with photos that are available.
  5. Don’t forget to credit your cover artist in your work.

Next time, I’ll talk about some other cover art I’ve had done: getting a very specific cover is harder than it looks!

*Print covers have to be pdfs and meet very specific width rules, so adding the print cover often costs quite a bit more.

 

Oathbreaker Now Available!

Oathbreaker, the newest novel in my Dreaming Death world, is now available as an ebook in all formats.

THE HORN: OATHBREAKER (BOOK 1)

Read the First Chapter here!

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Available at: Amazon / Barnes & Noble / Kobo / Apple /

 

From the world of Dreaming Death, we follow Amal, Lady Horn as she and her guards try to preserve one of the great secrets of Larossa: an abandoned Fortress. The Cince Empire want its secrets, and will do anything to get someone inside. The Oathbreakers–those members of each of the Six Families who speak to their Fortresses–all suspect that the Fortress is still alive.

Amal, the chief of the Oathbreakers, is one of only a handful of people aware of the true dangers the abandoned Fortress of Salonen presents. Now they must decide whether to wake the sleeping Fortress so it can defend itself against the Cince…or kill it forever.

Dalyan doesn’t know why he was sent to find the abandoned Fortress, what makes it worth the time his masters invested in training him. When the Horn arrest him for trespassing on the glacier beneath it, he goes with them willingly enough. After all, he didn’t return to his masters on schedule, and now they’re trying to kill him.

But more than that, he feels drawn to the abandoned Fortress, as if he belongs there…

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